Do you have low water pressure? Mornings can be difficult when trying to rinse your hair under a showerhead that barely produces a trickle. Low water pressure can be caused by various factors, some of which are exclusive to the room and others that affect the entire house.

Unfortunately, you may not know how much you rely on water to complete various jobs until you have a water supply problem.

In the worst-case scenario, you may be without water for an extended period. This blog post dives into what is happening when your pressure suddenly drops, why this happens, and how to fix small problems like this.

The 5 Most Common Causes of Water Pressure Problems

If you live in an area where the water pressure is low, it can be difficult to shower, wash your dishes, and use the bathroom. Decrease in pressure is also a common problem in homes built before the 1960s. Here are the five most common causes of decrease in pressure:

 

  • Failing Pressure Regulator

Pressure regulators keep the water flow from becoming too extreme. If the pressure in your entire house suddenly lowers, it could signify a malfunctioning pressure regulator.

 

  • Leaks

Leaking pipes frequently cause decreased pressure. Leaks in the plumbing redirect water flow, leaving you stranded. Sound or dampness in the vicinity can help you locate a leak.

A plumber may ask you to turn off all of the house’s water faucets and keep track of the water meter. If it reveals increased usage a few hours later, you probably have a slab leak.

 

  • Closed Valves

A water meter valve and the main shutoff valve are found in most residences. One of these valves may be closed or partially closed if you experience backflow pressure throughout the house.

 

  • Aging Infrastructure

Older pipes and pumps can often lose water pressure over time due to corrosion and wear. In some cases, this can be due to natural corrosion in underground water supplies.

If you’re having a hard time with your pressure, it might be worth investing in a water softener or filtration system to help restore lost pressure.

 

  • Low water tank capacity

If your house or apartment is built on a large plot of land with limited water resources, your municipality may have restricted how much water your property can use.

In some cases, this may also be due to environmental concerns – like contaminating local groundwater supplies by wastewater runoff – which may lead to higher water bills for homeowners.

If Your Home Utilizes a Pressure Regulator Check That It’s Fully Operational

A pressure regulator is put immediately after the main shutoff valve in specific homes in areas with greater than normal pressure to guarantee that the plumbing fixtures and pipes within the residence are not damaged by excessively high water pressure.

 

Additionally, the pressure that exceeds the standard PSI for a residential residence puts undue strain on the water system’s fixtures and valves, causing them to burst and causing major water damage if not contained.

 

In addition, if your home has a regulator, your backflow pressure could be caused by the regulator’s current setting or a damaged regulator, resulting in higher or lower water pressure than usual.

Some Ways to Fix Low Water Pressure

  • Fix the leaks in your plumbing

Once you’ve discovered a leak, you can clean and seal it yourself. More severe leaks may require replacements and the intervention of a professional plumber

 

  • Open Valves

The main shutoff valve is usually situated on an outside wall or in utility areas like the basement, laundry room, or garage.

A gate valve looks like a wheel; turn it counterclockwise to open it.  In addition, as with a water meter valve, make sure the lever is parallel to the pipe when opening a ball valve.

 

  • Fixing a Broken Pressure Regulator

Sudden, house-wide fluctuations in water pressure are an easy way to spot a broken pressure regulator. Connect a water pressure gauge to an exterior water faucet where a garden hose is connected to confirm any suspicions.

Contact a professional to repair the damaged pressure regulator if the water pressure is below the permissible range of 52 to 75 pounds per square inch. 

Think We Can Help with Your Problem? Contact Custom Plumbing of Arizona

Do you have low water pressure? If you’re tired of dealing with the bad flow, contact Custom Plumbing of Arizona at  602-883-2761. The sooner we address it, the less damage it will cause, and the sooner you’ll have normal water pressure again.

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Want to protect your home from water damage? In this article, we discuss how to find a water leak inside a wall so you can prevent a costly repair.

When leaks go undetected for a long time, they can cause substantial damage to your home and your belongings. From crumbling drywall and bubbling paint, to rotting flooring, to mold infestation, the problems that come with a leak inside the walls of your home can have serious, lasting consequences.

To discover and pinpoint a leak, follow these steps:

 

  1. Know the Signs of a Water Leak Inside a Wall

To locate and fix a leak inside your walls, you must first know that there is a leak to fix. Obvious signs of a leaking pipe located in the wall include standing water or wet carpeting near a wall and discoloration on the wall itself.

When excessive amounts of water accumulate within your walls, you may also notice a change in the wall’s texture. It may look like the paint or wallpaper on your drywall is bubbling or bulging. If your wall appears to bulge outward, that could be a sign of a major leak that needs to be addressed ASAP.

As is possible in any moist environment, if you have a leak inside your wall, you may notice the signs of mold. Mold can be harmful to breathe, so if you do notice mold growing on your walls, you should contact a professional.

  1. Keep an Eye on the Water Bill

A significant leak may lead to increases in your monthly water bill. If you know how much water you typically use every month, any increases that seem out of place could be a sign that you have a potential problem.

  1. Use a Moisture Meter to Locate the Leak

If you want to learn how to find a leak inside a wall, you may need to make a few purchases first. There are a lot of tools that homeowners can buy or rent to help detect a leak. One of these tools is the moisture meter. If you know the wall that has a leak inside it but not the exact location, take measurements in a few different places on the wall. The spots that read the highest are closest to the source of the leak.

  1. Locate the Leak with an Infrared Camera

Because moisture is cooler than the surrounding air and materials, you can also use an infrared camera to get an idea where a leak is coming from.

  1. Remove a Section of Drywall to Find the Leaking Pipe

Once you get a better read on where a leak is located, you can start removing drywall to start the repair process. Using a drywall saw, cut a large opening to put your head and a flashlight inside so you can look around for the leak.

4 Reasons You Might Have Water Leaking Behind Your Walls

A leaky pipe is one of the biggest stresses you can have in your home. This section will look at four common reasons for this, from corrosion to temperature changes. While leaks can be expensive to fix and cause damage to your home, if you take precautionary measures now and address any issues early on, you could avoid a lot of the headaches that come with water leaking behind your walls!

4 Common Reasons for Water Leaking from Your Plumbing

There are many reasons why plumbing could be leaking. Some of the most common reasons are corrosion, high water pressure, temperature changes, and a shifting foundation. If you notice that water is coming out of your pipes and you don’t know why, it’s important to shut off the water and contact a plumber as soon as possible before water damages your floors, walls, or ceilings.

1. Corrosion

When pipes are exposed to water and air, it can cause the metal to break down. When the metal gets too thin, it can easily spring a leak. If you have water leaking from a pipe, you need to examine your plumbing in various places to check for signs of corrosion. Sometimes plumbing needs to be replaced in large sections simultaneously, so if there is a leak in one place because of corrosion, you can bet that other piping sections will soon break down. To avoid an expensive disaster, get in touch with a plumber so they can inspect your pipes.

2. High water pressure

Sometimes, the high water pressure in your house can cause a leak in your plumbing. This often occurs when you live in an old home with pipes that aren’t adequate for the new water pressure. You may have noticed this problem because of water seeping from under the sink, running down the wall, or just dripping out of the faucet.

3. Temperature change

When water freezes, it expands. This expansion can create tiny cracks in the pipes, leading to leaks. When the temperature changes, your pipes might also need to adjust by expanding and contracting. If you notice a leak on your property during these times, the pipe is just adjusting to the temperature change. If this leak continues after you have let time pass or if there are other leaks inside your home, you may have a problem that requires professional help.

4. Shifts in your home’s foundation

Often, when your plumbing starts leaking, it’s because the ground around your home has shifted. This can happen because of heavy rains and years of wear and tear on the soil or if you have a pipe resting on newly settled soil. Shifts in the foundation may require extensive work to fix the problem.

What are the Causes of Moisture in Drywall?

The most common cause of drywall moisture is water seeping through the wall or ceiling installation. This water can come from the walls themselves or the ceiling above, and it can cause several problems. Furthermore, this process can lead to holes in the drywall, allowing moisture and other contaminants inside the wall. The same goes for water that seeps into the ceiling; it can cause damage to insulation and wiring, as well as the drywall itself. To avoid these problems, it’s essential to keep track of all changes in humidity levels.

How to Detect Moisture Behind Drywall

If you’re noticing water leaks behind drywall, there’s a good chance that moisture is the cause. Here are four ways to detect moisture behind drywall:

Check for Damaged Drywall

Moisture is likely behind the problem if you notice any signs of water damage or fraying in your drywall. To check for damage, start by feeling the wall for any dampness. Next, use a moisture meter to check the wall’s moisture level if it feels wet.

If the meter reads above 20%, moisture is present, and you’ll need to take steps to dry out the wall. If the meter reads below 20%, there may still be some moisture present, so you’ll want to keep an eye on the area for any further signs of damage.

Look for staining or discoloration of the wall.

Wall stains or discoloration can signify moisture behind the drywall. Another sign of water is if the wall feels warm or damp to the touch. 

Listen for Water Sounds

Several things can cause water sounds, but the most common is moisture. For example, if you hear strange noises from your walls, there may be too much moisture in the air. If you think you might have a moisture problem, consult a professional to get it sorted out.

Observe Signs of Wetness

Finally, one way to detect moisture behind drywall is by observing signs of wetness – like water droplets on the wall or floor or mildew growth.

5 Surprising Tools to Detect Moisture in Drywall

Do you ever need to drywall a room but have trouble finding the right tools? That is likely because there are so many tools available for this task. If you’re struggling to figure out what tools you should get, here’s a guide on five necessary tools on how to detect moisture behind drywall

1. Moisture meter

This tool uses light and sound sensors to detect air moisture levels.

2. Thermal camera

This camera uses infrared radiation to see through walls and ceilings. It is often used to inspect for water damage.

3. A vacuum cleaner with a wet/dry attachment

This attachment can be used to remove moisture from behind drywall. Using these tools can prevent damage to your home and protect your belongings.

4. A humidity meter 

It is the most accurate tool for detecting moisture behind drywall. But unfortunately, it is also the most expensive tool. 

5. A moisture tester 

It is less accurate than a humidity meter, but it is cheaper. Moreover, it can only measure the moisture level in the air.

Don’t Have Time to Learn How to Find a Water Leak Inside a Wall?

Don’t have time to learn how to find and fix a water leak inside a wall? Here at Custom Plumbing of Arizona, we’re ready and eager to help! We can get you fixed up so you can resume enjoying your home again.

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Thinking of adding a hard water treatment system to your plumbing? Get more information about why you should in this article.

You have scrubbed the deposits from your sink, felt the residue on your skin, replaced your shower head more times than you can remember—maybe it’s time to install a water softener.

If you are tired of dealing with the effects of hard water, this solution is pretty easy to put into action. Here are five reasons why you should stop putting it off.

5 Reasons to Install Hard Water Treatment

Scale Deposits

A clean home is a happy home, but hard water makes cleaning surfaces a pain. When the water on your shower door or in your kitchen sink evaporates, you’re left with a chalky substance—usually a mixture of calcium and magnesium. It is relatively easy to remove, but if you let even days pass between cleanings, your pristine home won’t look so pristine anymore. Hard water treatment can keep your home looking cleaner for longer.

Dull Laundry

Remember those laundry detergent commercials you watched on TV as a kid? Remember how bright and vibrant the clothes were after they were washed? Many people wonder why their clothing doesn’t stay colorful for long, and the answer is often the hard water running through their pipes. Installing a water softening system may do more to make your dull clothes pop with color than switching to a more expensive detergent brand.

Soap Scum

When minerals like calcium and magnesium mix with soap, the result is something nasty—soap scum. This substance is difficult to clean and can gunk up your drains if you don’t address the root of the problem.

Hair and Skin Health

When you have hard water, you might notice that you never really feel clean after a shower or bath. The residue that ends up on your water fixtures and bathroom tile is prone to clinging to your skin and hair, too, leaving you with dry skin and dull, stringy hair. Hard water treatment is a great way to up your beauty game.

Expensive Appliance and Pipe Failure

When mineral deposits form on your bathroom counter, it’s an annoyance. When it happens inside your pipes and water-using appliances, it can get expensive. Over time, the deposits will build inside your plumbing and any appliances—refrigerator, dishwasher, washing machine—that are connected to it. You may need to get your machines serviced to solve the problem, and in some cases, you may even need to replace them completely.

Already have hard water treatment installed? Water softener maintenance is key.

If you have already added a water-softening system to your home’s plumbing, it is critical to keep it working properly. Water softeners sometimes leak, which can cause significant damage if you don’t catch them immediately. You need to check your brine tank every other month and have the system serviced at least once a year by a professional to keep it working at its best.

Want to learn more? Check out our post on how to find and fix leaks in your water softener.

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Water leak repair often requires more than fixing the plumbing problem that caused the leak in the first place. Drywall is one of the most common casualties of a leaking pipe, especially drywall located on the ceiling.

Not only are water stains and water-damaged drywall an eyesore, they can also become a health hazard if left for too long. Mold and bacterial growth occur when moisture is present, so it is best to fix any damaged drywall quickly.

Follow these five simple steps to keep your home looking and feeling clean.

Find Where the Leak Is Coming from and Fix It

If you don’t fix the source of the water leak, there’s no point in trying to remove the water stain. Effective water leak repair requires you to address the source of the problem if you don’t want the stain to keep coming back.

In some cases, locating the leak is an easy task. In others, you may need to contact a professional. Once you have fixed the leak, you can begin repairing the drywall it has damaged.

Try Scrubbing First

As long as mold is not present, the water stain on your ceiling might only be a cosmetic problem. If the damage is superficial, mix a 1:1 ratio solution of bleach and water and blot it onto the stain while wearing gloves. You may need to scrub a little, but if this step removes the stain, all that remains is repainting the area to match the rest of the ceiling.

Remove the Damaged Drywall

For damaged drywall that requires a bit more extensive water leak repair, you may need to remove and replace the damaged section. If the stain only covers a small section, cut the affected area out using a keyhole saw.

You will have to judge whether removing an entire panel of drywall is justified, but if you need to take out an entire sheet, use a prybar or the claw end of a hammer to pull it free.

Replace the Section You Removed

If necessary, cut a section of drywall to match the missing portion you just removed. Using a drywall joint compound and a putty knife, fill in any cracks that remain to fix the drywall in place.

Once you have allowed the compound to dry, use sandpaper to smooth it out.

Complete the Water Leak Repair with Some Fresh Paint

Now that you have replaced the damaged drywall, it’s time to make things look nice. Apply primer and then paint the section to match the rest of the ceiling. If you can’t match the pain, you may need to repaint the entire ceiling so that it is not mismatched, although most hardware stores are able to match paint colors if you provide them with a sample.

Need Water Leak Repair Services to Prevent More Damage?

Do you have a leaking pipe that is causing damage to your home? Get in touch with the water leak repair experts at Custom Plumbing of Arizona.

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A water leak in your hot water heater is never fun and always inconvenient, no matter if the leak is a trickle or a deluge. Even if it does not seem very bad, you should schedule a water leak repair.

Do you know what to do if your hot water heater is leaking? If not, you could be facing massive water damage—and hundreds or thousands of dollars in repairs—in the near future.

If you want to be ready in case you experience a leak in your water heater, keep reading until the end of this article.

Turn off the Water Supply

When you notice water coming from your water heater and pooling on the floor, the first thing you need to do is turn off the water supply. Your water heater should have a shutoff valve attached to it. Inspect your water heater near where the cold water enters it. Once you find the valve, turn it off.

Some valves are shaped like a wheel. If that is the case for your water heater, turn it to the right until it stops moving. Other valves are shaped like handles, in which case turn yours 90 degrees from the position it is currently in.

It is possible that you either won’t be able to turn off your water heater supply valve or you won’t be able to find it. If you come up against this obstacle, turn off the main water supply valve to your home.

In the rare event that you cannot turn off either valve, contact an emergency plumber as soon as possible.

Inspect Your Hot Water Heater for the Source of the Leak

Once you have the water turned off, you can start to inspect your water heater. First, clean up any water that is on the water heater and on the floor. After you have the spills cleared, turn the water supply back on, and try running some hot water from a nearby tap. If you do not notice any new leaks forming, the water that was pooling on the floor and dripping from the heater was probably condensation and you don’t have to worry about fixing anything.

If the leak starts again, however, try to isolate the exact point it is coming from. Depending on where the leak is coming from, you may be able to tighten a connection to complete the water leak repair. It is important to know that working on a water leak repair on a water heater can be dangerous. If you do not know what you are doing, it is critical to call a professional.

Call a Water Leak Repair Expert

If you feel in over your head, there’s no need to worry. Call the plumbing experts at Custom Plumbing of Arizona. We don’t close, so contact us day or night, any day of the year. We will diagnose and fix your problem and be out of your hair so that you can get on with your day.

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