Toilet slow to fill? Find out why and what you can do to fix it in this article.

When you flush your toilet, does it seem the water fills too slowly? Homeowners often encounter this issue. Many factors can cause this problem. No matter how minor or expensive your toilet problem is, identifying it will allow you to apply the correct solution so the toilet can work optimally as quickly as possible.

What makes a toilet slow to fill, and what can be done to fix it?

The toilet tank usually refills in about a minute, depending on the water pressure in your home. You may have an issue if it’s taking a long time to complete.

    Clogged vents.

Clogged vents prevent air from escaping the tank, which will cause the water to take longer to fill. Remove the roof cover and inspect the vent to determine if it is clogged. Make sure it’s clear of leaves or debris if it has gotten clogged up.

How to fix it?

Remove anything clogging the vent with needle-nose pliers if it is clogged. Run a vinegar/baking soda plunger through your drain to clear it. One cup of baking soda should be added to six cups of vinegar. Allow the toilet to soak for 10 minutes before flushing.

    Problem with water supply valves

The flapper is located just above the water supply valve of your toilet tank, which controls the water flow leading to your toilet tank. If it is partially closed or if it is not performing correctly, the water may not be able to reach the right place at the right time. An additional issue with the valve could be debris build-up in the valve, which could restrict the flow of water, causing the valve to fill slower.

How to fix it?

The fill valve can be adjusted by following these steps:

  •     The fill valve can most often be found on the left side of the tank when you remove the tank lid.
  •     Attach the fill valve evenly and securely to the tube.
  •     Older toilets need an adjustment screw that can be loosened with a flathead screwdriver or their fill valves raised to let more water in.
  •     You can add more water to the tank of a newer toilet by turning the fill valve adjustment knob with your hand.
  •     Ensure that the overflow tube is about one inch below the top of the water level on all toilets that have them.
  •     Ensure that the tank is filling properly and that the correct amount of water is being pumped into the tank when you flush it.

 

    Waterlogged Float Ball

If you have a toilet that is slow to fill, it could be the float ball. The float ball on the water surface controls the level of incoming water. Flooding the float ball with water prevents the tank from filling efficiently. There are, therefore, chances of the tank not filling with enough water or that it will take longer than expected to refill with water.

How to fix it?

  •     Ensure that the float ball does not float too low in the water, ensure that the float arm is firmly attached to the tank. It might be necessary to bend the arm upward slightly. When the ball is raised from the bottom of the tank, water can flow more freely into the tank since the ball has been raised.
  •     A replacement float ball will possibly need to be installed if this does not solve the problem and you are still persuaded that the float ball is the cause.

 

     Fill valve tube problems

Inside the toilet tank, there is a device that looks like a vertical tube having a fill valve on the end. The primary purpose of the fill valve is to regulate how much water goes into the tank. Fill valves might become clogged, worn down, or displaced over time. The result is that the toilet may be unable to fill completely with water.

How to fix it?

Clean the valve tube of debris to fix a clogged valve.

  •     Put an end to the water supply by shutting off the taps.
  •     Disconnect the valve’s hardware.
  •     If the tube is dirty, clean it out with a bottle brush or a wire.
  •     We recommend opening and closing the water supply valve a few times to flush out any leftover residue and see if any clogs have been cleaned.
  •     To see if the toilet is filling properly after flushing, you may need to replace the hardware and the tube.

Replace the valve tube if it is cracked, ripped, or appears worn or damaged, or if it has any holes or tears

Toilet Slow to Fill: Conclusion

The toilet tank fills slowly, making flushing much more difficult. The problem can occur with either a two-piece or one-piece toilet. Sometimes, when you flush the toilet after a weak sound and poor flow, you find the freshly flushed feces staring back at you after those awkward times. Hopefully, this post will provide you with enough information to help you understand your problem with your toilet tank.

Need help? Contact a professional plumber at Custom Plumbing of Arizona today.

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Got a smelly shower drain? Check out some of the reasons for the unpleasant odors here, as well as some helpful tips.

A hideous smell from the shower drain will deter you from feeling clean. Showering is an essential part of the daily routine of most people. Getting into the shower is an expectation that you will smell the scent of soap. There are times when problems with the shower drain, such as mildew or sewer odors can get in, and you cut your shower short. There is nothing worse than smelling the odor of your shower drain rising up in the air since it can feel too embarrassing. The truth is, however, that drains often come with unpleasant odors.

 

It is often possible to clear up a smelly shower drain with a good clean of the trap and drain. Still, sometimes the smell can be a sign of something more serious that requires the help of a professional plumber. Depending on the cause, we can attribute the smelly shower to various reasons.

4 Possible Reasons for a Smelly Shower Drain

It is important to note the unpleasant smell you notice in the bathroom when a shower drain makes your nose wrinkle. This way, you can identify the possible source of the smell. Following are some possible reasons behind the smelly shower drain.

    Clogged Drains

It is important to clean your shower drain regularly. Several reasons may contribute to it becoming blocked, including hair that can accumulate in soap scum, debris, or the P-Trap. A solid clog can result in unpleasant odors emanating from the shower as a result. Such clogs can easily be cleaned up using the right tools, chemical solutions, or a professional’s help.

How to Clear a Drain Clog

To clear out a drain clog, you’ll need to take off the face shield on your plunger to get a better grip before plunging it into the blockage. Common causes of smelly shower drain like this can be very difficult because it requires you to use one hand inside the dirty p-trap while using the other for the plunge – which is uncomfortable at best.

    Problem with the P-trap

P-trap problems are common issues. The P-trap may cause an unpleasant smell that appears in your bathroom after a shower if it smells like a sewer. There is a U-shaped pipe underneath your shower drain where the water passes. If you can see it, you will be able to see how it works. It is called the P-trap. Its purpose is to prevent sewage gasses from returning up the pipe and into the bathroom by holding a small amount of water at all times.

How to Clean Shower P-Traps

When cleaning this section of pipe, check the trap for debris. A paper towel or old rag can help unclog its passage if it appears that something is blocking it. To fill the P-trap completely with no air pockets, take care to remove all debris from inside the tub, then fill the tub with cold water. By flushing out other blockages, the bad smell can be eliminated.

    Biofilms build-up

Biofilm is another common cause of shower odor. It is possible to build up biofilm inside the shower drain and on the shower wall, resulting in musty, unpleasant odors. You are likely suffering from mold or a biofilm inside the shower drain if the drain smells like mildew. Biofilm can have negative health effects. The bathtub drain needs to be cleaned and the rest of your shower to avoid these dangers and odors. It is possible that your drain needs to be jetted or cleaned by a professional if it still smells mildew despite your best efforts. It is an inexpensive and simple fix.

How to fix it?

For a biofilm problem to be solved, you will need to use a special enzyme-based product that targets bacteria and germs. Additionally, you will also require a few other techniques. In many cases, unclean maintenance of these areas in the shower drain is at the root of the problem, leading to build-up.

    Pipes with leaks

It may be that your shower drain still smells if the water is draining well and the pipes are not clogged with hair or biofilm. You will smell rotten eggs from your shower drain if there are leaks in your bathroom wall or under the shower, allowing sewer gasses to escape.

 

For sewer gasses to be contained, they need to come from the P-trap, and if they don’t, there is a leak somewhere in the drain line.

 

Usually, shower leaks result in rotten egg-like odors because sulfurous gasses are expelled through the drain system. Shower drain smells can be caused by corrosion on your pipes and by loose joints such as those below your toilet seat or on the taps on your sink.

How to Fix it?

Changing corroded joints in your drain system to tighten them and replacing sections of pipe that could be rusting are both things you can do to get rid of shower smells emanating from your drain system. As daunting as this task may seem, it is absolutely necessary to maintain a safe interior living environment within the bathroom to maintain the quality of life there.

Final Verdict for Your Smelly Shower Drain

The smell of a smelly shower drain or, even worse, stench spread throughout your home due to leaks, and other causes aren’t desirable. To prevent unwanted odors and other health hazards, it is essential to identify and address problems at the earliest possible time. A professional plumber can handle all of your plumbing issues in your home, inspecting and resolving any issues that might arise.

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A sagging sewer line can become a serious problem if you don’t fix it. Here’s what you can expect.

One flush. Two flushes. Three flushes. Four.

Once again, you have found yourself standing next to the toilet, pushing the lever and staring as the you-know-what spins round and round but refuses to go down. Don’t worry, it’s not you—it’s your sagging sewer line.

Then again, maybe you should worry. If something is wrong with your sewer line, you know it’s going to be expensive to fix. But just like your clogged toilet, a sewer line belly is not going to go away on its own.

In fact, it might just cause more damage if you let it sit, and that really stinks.

What is a sewer line belly?

A sagging sewer line, or belly, occurs when a dip forms at one or more spots along the sewer pipe. Most sewer lines use gravity to transfer waste from a home to the sewer. The water you send down the drain carries the solid waste down a sloping pipe that leads from your home to the main sewer system. Sometimes, the slope of a sewer line gets disrupted, which prevents the water and solid waste from moving freely to its destination.

What causes a sagging sewer line?

A sewer belly has many possible causes. Sometimes, the soil that supports a portion of the pipe settles, and over time the line begins to sag. Seasonal temperature changes, excessive rain, and poor soil compaction at the time the pipe was laid—all of these factors can contribute to a sagging sewer line. Other times, tree roots slowly push down against the soil and the sewer pipe.

When your sewer line begins to sag, you can expect to experience some common—and often nasty—consequences.

3 Nasty Effects of a Sagging Sewer Line

Clogged Line

When you have a belly in your sewer line, solid waste can become trapped in the low-lying area of the pipe. As you send more and more waste down the drain, the solids can build up until your line is completely clogged.

Backed Up Sewer Line

If your sewer line is totally obstructed, you run the risk of a sewage backing up into your home. As you can imagine, the resulting mess is horrifying and can lead to the spread of nasty bacteria inside your house, which can become a health hazard if it is not properly cleaned.

Sewage Leak

Sagging sewer lines may also crack. When cracks form in your sewer pipe, the waste water can leak into your yard. Even a small crack can lead to big problems because the water that escapes can erode the soil and contribute to more severe sagging, which can contribute to further cracking, and on and on.

How to Fix a Sag in a Sewer Line

Homeowners may be unfamiliar with the fact that sewage waste is often moved using gravity. There are a number of issues that can happen with this type of system, such as sagging. While a sagging sewer line is fixable, the cost may vary depending on the repair method.

Why Sagging Sewer Lines Are a Problem

Sewer pipes are installed with a positive slope, because they are gravity-based and work to push waste away from your home. In most cases, the angle is somewhere around 1/4 inch of drop for every foot of piping. However, if you have limited space, the slope can be as small as 1/8 inch, even though this is not preferable.

A sag in a sewer line, also known as a belly, creates a pool that blogs sewage from being pushed away from your home. Eventually, if the sag is severe enough, it can lead to clogs that block the entire pipe.

Improper soil compaction and natural soil shifting can cause the pipe to sag, which can lead to a significant risk of leaking or breaking.

Dig and Replace Method

The traditional method for replacing a sagging sewer line is known as the dig and replace method. As the name implies, a contractor will dig down into your property until the sagging section of pipe is exposed, then repair the pipe and backfill the trench. In many cases, this method costs about $60 per foot of piping that has to be replaced, but other factors can make it even more expensive. For instance, if the contractor has to pull up asphalt or concert to access the pipe, it can be quite expensive.

Trenchless Sewer Pipe Replacement

Over the years, we have learned how to fix a sag in a sewer pipe using new methods. These methods include in-line expansion and sliplining. These methods usually cost between $40 and $80 per foot and don’t require digging up your property.

How to Fix a Sag in a Sewer Pipe Under the House

In some homes, the sewer pipes are accessible from the basement or crawlspace. Sewer pipes are heavy, so if they are not secured properly to the structure of your home, they may cause the rest of the sewer line to sag. Sometimes this happens when the home slowly settles into the soil.

Homeowners may be able to fix this problem on their own, but in most situations, it is best to hire a trained and licensed professional to avoid causing unnecessary damage.

Should I repair my sagging sewer line?

It may be tempting to put off sewer line repairs when a sag occurs, but homeowners should use caution. When you try to save money by putting off repairs, it can cost you more later, since problems tend to worsen over time.

Want to prevent extensive damage from a sagging sewer line? Get an inspection today!

A sewer line belly is one of the last things you want to experience. For your peace of mind, if you suspect your sewer line may be in trouble, we suggest that you get it inspected.

Let Custom Plumbing of Arizona help you determine if you have a sagging sewer line. Contact us today to get the help you need.

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One of the most important components in any bathroom is the toilet. It’s position, shape, and even color can dictate the feel of an entire room. This blog post is a large compilation of different types of toilet flanges and their construction, so you might want to check it out if you’ve ever wondered which type your toilet uses!

Before learning what types of toilet flanges are available, what exactly are toilet flanges?

Every toilet flange on a bowl is designed to provide the flow of water from the bowl to the sewer. Depending on what kind of toilet and plumbing you have, there are numerous types that can be found.

What are the different types of toilet flanges?

Copper

Copper is a unique metal because it has the ability to form into different alloys when mixed with other metals, resulting in a range of advantages. These benefits include better conductivity and strength, as well as greater corrosion resistance, which is essential for all types of toilet flanges. Copper is also relatively inexpensive to manufacture, which makes it a popular choice for plumbing applications.

PVC

PVC is a type of plastic that is used in the manufacture of flanges. PVC was first produced by Bayer in Germany in 1872 and was originally intended for use as a medicinal compound. PVC toilet flanges are commonly used in both residential and commercial plumbing systems. This type of toilet flange comes in a few different forms—either completely made of PVC or with a metal top. These types of toilet flanges fit drainpipes that are three or four inches across.

Brass

Brass is one of the most commonly used types of toilet flanges. Like copper, brass is malleable and resistant to corrosion, which makes this material a great choice if you want a toilet flange that lasts.

Cast Iron

Cast iron flanges are meant to be used with cast iron pipes. Cast iron is extremely durable and resistant to damage. In some cases, it may be possible to repair a cast iron flange instead of replacing it completely.

Aluminum

Because it is lightweight, corrosion-resistant, and durable, aluminum is an excellent choice for your toilet flange. This metal will not rust or corrode, so it should last for years before needing to be replaced again. Some aluminum flanges are pure aluminum and others are manufactured with copper or zinc. While the pure aluminum type is generally better, both are suitable for use on your toilet.

How to Tell When a Toilet Flange Needs to Be Replaced

If you are not sure when your flange was last replaced, you can continue using it until it malfunctions, or if you want to avoid a mess, you can replace it to start fresh. A worn-out flange can cause a wide range of problems, including:

  • Leaking at the base of the toilet.
  • Loose toilet that rocks back and forth and may be unsecured.
  • Unpleasant smells coming from the sewer because of gases leaking through the seal.

If you notice any of these signs, it may be time to replace your toilet’s flange sooner rather than later.

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Sometimes a home’s plumbing has to be replaced. Wondering what is involved in repiping a house? This article explains.

Unless your home is a cabin in the woods with no running water (or if you live—to quote the late, great Chris Farley—in a van down by the river), you are going to have to deal with plumbing issues at some point. For some, that means fixing a leaky pipe or two. For others, that means having their entire plumbing system replaced.

Repiping a house normally involves 4 steps:

  1. Inspection.
  2. Estimate.
  3. Demolition.
  4. Plumbing.
  5. Reconstruction.

To be clear, replacing your home’s plumbing is not a DIY job. You are going to need a professional, licensed plumber to handle this project. Are you thinking of repiping your home? Here’s what you need to know.

How Do I Know If I Need to Repipe My Home?

Before we get into the specifics of what is involved in repiping a home, you first need to determine whether your home requires it. Repiping is an expensive, time-consuming process — but here are a few signs that your home needs a new plumbing system.

Lead Pipes

Lead pipes are common in older houses from the 1920s and earlier, but even later homes may have this kind of piping system. They present lots of health hazards for you and your family. When these pipes corrode, lead can leak into your drinking water and cause harm to your heart, kidneys, and reproductive organs (even at low levels).

The bottom line: If your home was built before 1986, find out what materials your plumbing system is made out of and replace any lead pipes!

Galvanized Steel Pipes

Before the 1960s, galvanized steel pipes were common in homes. However, these pipes are coated in zinc. While this zinc lining helps to prevent rust and discoloration, lead deposits can build up when it corrodes. Not only is this harmful to drink, the deposits can build up and clog your plumbing.

If your home was built before this time period, consider giving your plumbing system a once over.

High Plumbing Repair Costs

If you seem to find a new plumbing problem every month, it might be time to replace the pipes in your home. Even if the issues seem minor, the repair costs can quickly add up over time. Instead of spending money on numerous small fixes, it might actually be cheaper to install a new plumbing system altogether.

What is Involved in Repiping a Home?

In this section, we’ll cover what happens before, during, and after a repiping.

  1. Inspection.

If you are unsure what kind of work you need completed, you don’t need to worry. The first step in the repiping process is an inspection conducted by a plumbing professional, who will listen to the problems you have been having and look for signs of the kind of work you need done. Without a thorough inspection, you can’t know what is involved in repiping a house.

  1. Estimate and Recommendations.

Once your repiping specialist finishes the inspection, they will give you their recommendations. Depending on the age of your home, the layout of your plumbing, your needs, and any other relevant details, they will recommend the best course of action, including which materials are best for your situation and what work is most urgent. You may need to replace everything or only a small section.

It is critical to think about how much you are willing to risk your home if you decide to only do a small section or to repipe your home bit by bit. It may help you budget to cover the costs, but if your pipes are at risk of failing, it could save you money in the long run to do the entire project at once.

You should also expect an estimate for the work that is to be done. Most plumbing companies, including Custom Plumbing of Arizona, offer a free estimate to give you an idea of the cost.

  1. Demolition.

Once you accept the estimate, it’s time for the professionals to get to work. If you watch even for a few minutes, you will see first-hand what is involved in repiping a house—and it’s a lot! From locating the pipes behind walls and in ceilings to demolition and installation, they do it all.

Good plumbers will take care to protect your home from any possible water damage during repairs, placing plastic sheeting over furniture and moving family possessions when necessary. They also need to turn off and drain any water lines.

Once they turn off your plumbing system, they will get to work cutting through your drywall. A plumber will try to remove as little material as possible to minimize reconstruction costs.

  1. Plumbing.

After your plumber has made their cuts, they will detach your old pipes and install new ones. For pipes in your floor, they will try to go through the ceiling of the bottom floor if possible.

Once the repiping is done, your plumber will need to turn the water lines back on in order to test the new pipes and determine if there are any leaks. If there are leaks, your professional will take care that they are patched up.

  1. Reconstruction.

Once it’s determined that all the pipes are working properly, your drywall contractor or other professional will need to patch up your walls. They should repair and seal your drywall, then paint over it for a nice, smooth finish.

How Long Will I Need to Wait for the Job to Finish?

The length of the repiping project will depend on how large your house is and how many bathrooms you have in your home. For small houses, a plumbing expert might take only two days to complete. However, larger houses could take up to a week.

Want more information on what is involved in repiping a house? Talk to the plumbing experts at Custom Plumbing of Arizona.

Get in touch with Custom Plumbing today if you are interested in receiving a free estimate for your home repiping project. Call us at 602-883-2761!

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