When your hot water runs out fast, you might be able to find a solution. Here are a few reasons it could be happening.

A hot shower can be both therapeutic and a way to naturally clean yourself. Once hot water runs out, a burst of cold water can shock you. When you’re a busy homeowner, you always want an easy solution for long hot showers.

A variety of factors affect the amount of hot water you have to use, including the type of water heater, size of the tank, temperature of the shower, the rate at which the tank reheats, and flow rate of your showerhead.

Hot water runs out fast for a variety of reasons

In a house, many reasons might be to blame when hot water runs out faster than average, but here are just a few: rusty pipes, power supply problems, sediment,  a blown pilot light, broken dip tubes, etc.

      Deposition of sediment

The sediment building up inside the tank is likely causing your hot water to drop efficiently and last less than it used to. If this change has been gradual, there is a chance you may have sediment build-up.

Over time, dissolved minerals from your water will settle on the bottom of your water heater tank, and the capacity can be reduced. This is due to the accumulation of dissolved minerals and sediment within the water heater.

You may be wondering what the best way to maintain your water heater is if you have a 40-gallon tank with a sediment build-up of 5 gallons and only 35 gallons of water in it currently is.

      Mini Water Heater

If you notice that your water heater is not big enough for your house or needs, it may also be why you are not getting enough hot water. If the heater was installed yourself, this might be the case.

To determine what size is appropriate for your residence, you should consult an expert. It would be best to consider that some tankless systems offer a constant supply of hot water.

      Dip tube broken

A dip tube likely broke if you have been experiencing temperature issues more recently. If this is the case, you should be looking for tiny pieces of plastic that you may find in your shower head, in drain strainers, or even on the screens of your appliance filters to check.

It is likely that the dip tube of your water heater is damaged if you find plastic pieces. To get the water heated up, it is sent to the bottom part of the tank, where it receives the heating. The cold water tends to stay at the top of the pipe when it breaks, but hot water comes out of the bottom instead.

Moreover, because it is not below to be heated, it stays cold for a more extended period. You may wish to contact a professional to confirm that the dip tube needs to be replaced if the problem persists.

      Thermostat not working

A thermostat is not only in your home but also in your water heater. It would be best if you tried to reset your water heater thermostat every time you run out of hot water.

It is worth checking your water heater’s thermostat temperature to see if the temperature is set wrong if the problem persists. If this does not solve the problem, you may need to contact a plumber to ascertain the source of the problem.

       Hot water runs out fast because it’s reheating too slowly

There is a good possibility that you are experiencing problems only when you take unusually long showers or when guests are over. In this case, the problem is probably the recovery time of your water heater.

In the chance of back-to-back showers, the hot water can be drained from the tank, resulting in a long wait until the water is reheated again.

Conclusion to Why Hot Water Runs Out Fast

Think about installing a tankless water heater if you never want to run out of hot water. In addition to ensuring that you always have an unlimited supply of hot water at hand whenever you need it, you will also be able to operate multiple appliances – and even several showers –all at once. Also, tankless water heaters last longer than conventional models and save you more money over time.

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If you notice your water softener leaking, you don’t need to panic, but you should fix it as soon as possible. In this article, I talk about some of the most common scenarios as well as some solutions that you can try on your own before contacting a plumber.

Important note: before trying to figure out where the water is coming from, disconnect the water softener’s power supply. Always remember, safety first!

Scenario #1: Rotor Valve

The rotor valve on your water softener is usually located at the top of the unit. As the source of water into the water softener, the rotor valve is often the source of leaks. Over time, it can develop cracks and need to be replaced.

If you do not notice any cracks or breakage around the rotor valve but you can see water coming from it, the problem could be the seal located on the inside of the valve. In either case, you will need to contact a professional plumber to fix the issue.

Scenario #2: Punctured Brine Tank

The brine tank is where you place the salt. In case you didn’t know, water softeners work by replacing calcium and magnesium ions in your water with sodium ions. A puncture in the brine tank usually means that you need to replace the tank altogether. In some cases, certain sealants might work, but be careful what you use—picking the wrong one could seriously damage your water softener system.

Scenario #3: Loose Hose Connection

In this third scenario, the solution is often straightforward. If you notice your water softener leaking from the supply hose, try tightening the connection. The problem could be that simple.

If tightening the connection does not stop the leak, the hose could be punctured. When this happens, you will need to replace the hose.

 

Scenario #4: Defective Bypass Valve O-Rings

Some water softeners have a valve that allows the water to bypass the system. The bypass valve is a convenience in case you need to repair or replace part of the water softener without cutting off water to your home, but if you notice your water softener leaking, it could be the cause, too.

On the bypass valve are located what are called O-rings. As your system gets older, these O-rings may need to be replaced if you do not maintain them. Replacing the O-rings requires special tools and skills, so it is best to contact a plumber with experience fixing water softener systems.

Water Softener Bypass Valve Leaking? Here’s What You Should Know

What is a water softener bypass valve?

In place of a drain valve, there is the bypass valve on the water softener. The switch opens the bypass by introducing water from the main system to the water softening system. The water goes through and flows into two or more lines, creating unique flushes for every single household connected to this household unit.

It is possible that you’ll face a water line disruption in your home, which might require replacing the water softener. During this time the displaced water needs to be cleaned and flushed through the system. This can normally take at least 90 minutes of continuous activity to complete.

If you want to avoid the situation where you have to drain the softener first and then clean it, you can use something called a bypass valve. When using a bypass valve, you utilize it before getting water from the softener by opening a valve before bringing in the water.

The bypass valve gives you full control over the water flow system. You can turn the valves on or off in accordance with your needs.

Do not be confused while looking at the valve, though complicated it looks. The pipes fixed to the wall might have a variety of control tabs, which indicate how the water goes through them and gets to your plumbing system. Examine each tab so you can understand what’s going on at each point in the pipe, but pay attention to the flow of water all throughout!

Once you understand how the whole structure works, it’s easy to bypass the water softener by changing the valves themselves.

Learn the basics of what a bypass valve does

The bypass valve is used to change the water flow from the water softener to the mainline connection to the home.

However, your home has a backup system in place to give you the reassurance of never having to go without water.

A bypass valve is used to help better control the water flow in and out of your faucets. Shut off your water valves and use this valve to free up the system so you can continue using water.

How to replace your water softener bypass valve

Know where the water softener valve starts, where it ends, and the location of the bypass valve before you start

1. Cut the connection of the water softener system from the main water line.

2. Remove the bypass valve from the connection.

3. You can first use another pipe to serve as a valve and then connect the two pipes at the connection or use other pipes to assemble the water.

You should be sure that both the inward and outward flow of the water softener system are properly sealed. If they are not, you could risk a leak.

4. When complete, turn the water on to allow the water to flow into the softener.

 

Water softener resin tank leaking from bottom? Here’s how to fix it.

One of the most common problems that homeowners run into with their water softener is a leaking resin tank, which can be caused by a variety of different factors. Luckily for you, this blog post has an easy fix for any leaking water softener resin tank!

Softener resin tank leaks from the bottom

Resin tanks are designed to be watertight to prevent leaks, but in some cases, resin tanks will leak from the bottom. When a leak occurs, the tank must be patched or replaced. When installing a new resin tank, it is important to use the same brand and model of resin tank as before.

How to fix a leaking water softener resin tank

A resin tank is one of the most important components of a water softener. The water passes through the resin and becomes softer. Over time, the tank can develop leaks, so it is critical to know how to fix any holes that form. To fix the problem, you will need to drain, clean, and patch the leaking resin tank.

Step 1: Drain the Resin Tank

First, you will need to shut off the water. Wait for as long as it takes for the tank to drain, noting where the leak or crack is located for future reference. Once the tank is drained, you can disassemble it and clean it.

Step 2: Clean the Resin Tank

Once you have disassembled the resin tank and set the resin beads to the side, it’s time to clean the tank. One way to clean the tank is to use a bleach and water solution to soak the resin tank in. After it has soaked, be sure that any salt and iron deposits are removed using a toothbrush. Now that the tank is clean, you can start the repair process.

Step 3: Patch the Resin Tank

Remembering where the crack or leak was located on the resin tank, sand the area around the crack to create an abrasive surface. This allows the epoxy to bind with the resin tank more firmly. Now take some waterproof epoxy and fill any cracks in the tank with a putty knife. Allow the epoxy to dry according to the instructions on the container. Once the epoxy is dry, you can reassemble the water softener.
Be sure to check on the leak as time goes on. Sometimes repairing a leaking resin tank can take a few attempts. If you need to repatch the resin tank because it is still leaking, follow the above steps again.

 

Is Your Water Softener Leaking? Contact Custom Plumbing of Arizona for Help

In Arizona, having a water softener is critical to protect your home’s plumbing and appliances from hard water buildup. Is your water softener leaking? Don’t wait too long to fix it. It could turn into a much more expensive problem.

Need help? That’s why we are here. Contact us today to schedule a visit from one of our expert plumbers.

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Want to protect your home from water damage? In this article, we discuss how to find a water leak inside a wall so you can prevent a costly repair.

When leaks go undetected for a long time, they can cause substantial damage to your home and your belongings. From crumbling drywall and bubbling paint, to rotting flooring, to mold infestation, the problems that come with a leak inside the walls of your home can have serious, lasting consequences.

To discover and pinpoint a leak, follow these steps:

 

  1. Know the Signs of a Water Leak Inside a Wall

To locate and fix a leak inside your walls, you must first know that there is a leak to fix. Obvious signs of a leaking pipe located in the wall include standing water or wet carpeting near a wall and discoloration on the wall itself.

When excessive amounts of water accumulate within your walls, you may also notice a change in the wall’s texture. It may look like the paint or wallpaper on your drywall is bubbling or bulging. If your wall appears to bulge outward, that could be a sign of a major leak that needs to be addressed ASAP.

As is possible in any moist environment, if you have a leak inside your wall, you may notice the signs of mold. Mold can be harmful to breathe, so if you do notice mold growing on your walls, you should contact a professional.

  1. Keep an Eye on the Water Bill

A significant leak may lead to increases in your monthly water bill. If you know how much water you typically use every month, any increases that seem out of place could be a sign that you have a potential problem.

  1. Use a Moisture Meter to Locate the Leak

If you want to learn how to find a leak inside a wall, you may need to make a few purchases first. There are a lot of tools that homeowners can buy or rent to help detect a leak. One of these tools is the moisture meter. If you know the wall that has a leak inside it but not the exact location, take measurements in a few different places on the wall. The spots that read the highest are closest to the source of the leak.

  1. Locate the Leak with an Infrared Camera

Because moisture is cooler than the surrounding air and materials, you can also use an infrared camera to get an idea where a leak is coming from.

  1. Remove a Section of Drywall to Find the Leaking Pipe

Once you get a better read on where a leak is located, you can start removing drywall to start the repair process. Using a drywall saw, cut a large opening to put your head and a flashlight inside so you can look around for the leak.

4 Reasons You Might Have Water Leaking Behind Your Walls

A leaky pipe is one of the biggest stresses you can have in your home. This section will look at four common reasons for this, from corrosion to temperature changes. While leaks can be expensive to fix and cause damage to your home, if you take precautionary measures now and address any issues early on, you could avoid a lot of the headaches that come with water leaking behind your walls!

4 Common Reasons for Water Leaking from Your Plumbing

There are many reasons why plumbing could be leaking. Some of the most common reasons are corrosion, high water pressure, temperature changes, and a shifting foundation. If you notice that water is coming out of your pipes and you don’t know why, it’s important to shut off the water and contact a plumber as soon as possible before water damages your floors, walls, or ceilings.

1. Corrosion

When pipes are exposed to water and air, it can cause the metal to break down. When the metal gets too thin, it can easily spring a leak. If you have water leaking from a pipe, you need to examine your plumbing in various places to check for signs of corrosion. Sometimes plumbing needs to be replaced in large sections simultaneously, so if there is a leak in one place because of corrosion, you can bet that other piping sections will soon break down. To avoid an expensive disaster, get in touch with a plumber so they can inspect your pipes.

2. High water pressure

Sometimes, the high water pressure in your house can cause a leak in your plumbing. This often occurs when you live in an old home with pipes that aren’t adequate for the new water pressure. You may have noticed this problem because of water seeping from under the sink, running down the wall, or just dripping out of the faucet.

3. Temperature change

When water freezes, it expands. This expansion can create tiny cracks in the pipes, leading to leaks. When the temperature changes, your pipes might also need to adjust by expanding and contracting. If you notice a leak on your property during these times, the pipe is just adjusting to the temperature change. If this leak continues after you have let time pass or if there are other leaks inside your home, you may have a problem that requires professional help.

4. Shifts in your home’s foundation

Often, when your plumbing starts leaking, it’s because the ground around your home has shifted. This can happen because of heavy rains and years of wear and tear on the soil or if you have a pipe resting on newly settled soil. Shifts in the foundation may require extensive work to fix the problem.

What are the Causes of Moisture in Drywall?

The most common cause of drywall moisture is water seeping through the wall or ceiling installation. This water can come from the walls themselves or the ceiling above, and it can cause several problems. Furthermore, this process can lead to holes in the drywall, allowing moisture and other contaminants inside the wall. The same goes for water that seeps into the ceiling; it can cause damage to insulation and wiring, as well as the drywall itself. To avoid these problems, it’s essential to keep track of all changes in humidity levels.

How to Detect Moisture Behind Drywall

If you’re noticing water leaks behind drywall, there’s a good chance that moisture is the cause. Here are four ways to detect moisture behind drywall:

Check for Damaged Drywall

Moisture is likely behind the problem if you notice any signs of water damage or fraying in your drywall. To check for damage, start by feeling the wall for any dampness. Next, use a moisture meter to check the wall’s moisture level if it feels wet.

If the meter reads above 20%, moisture is present, and you’ll need to take steps to dry out the wall. If the meter reads below 20%, there may still be some moisture present, so you’ll want to keep an eye on the area for any further signs of damage.

Look for staining or discoloration of the wall.

Wall stains or discoloration can signify moisture behind the drywall. Another sign of water is if the wall feels warm or damp to the touch. 

Listen for Water Sounds

Several things can cause water sounds, but the most common is moisture. For example, if you hear strange noises from your walls, there may be too much moisture in the air. If you think you might have a moisture problem, consult a professional to get it sorted out.

Observe Signs of Wetness

Finally, one way to detect moisture behind drywall is by observing signs of wetness – like water droplets on the wall or floor or mildew growth.

5 Surprising Tools to Detect Moisture in Drywall

Do you ever need to drywall a room but have trouble finding the right tools? That is likely because there are so many tools available for this task. If you’re struggling to figure out what tools you should get, here’s a guide on five necessary tools on how to detect moisture behind drywall

1. Moisture meter

This tool uses light and sound sensors to detect air moisture levels.

2. Thermal camera

This camera uses infrared radiation to see through walls and ceilings. It is often used to inspect for water damage.

3. A vacuum cleaner with a wet/dry attachment

This attachment can be used to remove moisture from behind drywall. Using these tools can prevent damage to your home and protect your belongings.

4. A humidity meter 

It is the most accurate tool for detecting moisture behind drywall. But unfortunately, it is also the most expensive tool. 

5. A moisture tester 

It is less accurate than a humidity meter, but it is cheaper. Moreover, it can only measure the moisture level in the air.

Don’t Have Time to Learn How to Find a Water Leak Inside a Wall?

If you know you have a leak but don’t have the time to learn how to find and fix it, contact the pros at Custom Plumbing of Arizona. We will get you fixed up so you can get back to enjoying your home.

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Thinking of adding a hard water treatment system to your plumbing? Get more information about why you should in this article.

You have scrubbed the deposits from your sink, felt the residue on your skin, replaced your shower head more times than you can remember—maybe it’s time to install a water softener.

If you are tired of dealing with the effects of hard water, this solution is pretty easy to put into action. Here are five reasons why you should stop putting it off.

5 Reasons to Install Hard Water Treatment

Scale Deposits

A clean home is a happy home, but hard water makes cleaning surfaces a pain. When the water on your shower door or in your kitchen sink evaporates, you’re left with a chalky substance—usually a mixture of calcium and magnesium. It is relatively easy to remove, but if you let even days pass between cleanings, your pristine home won’t look so pristine anymore. Hard water treatment can keep your home looking cleaner for longer.

Dull Laundry

Remember those laundry detergent commercials you watched on TV as a kid? Remember how bright and vibrant the clothes were after they were washed? Many people wonder why their clothing doesn’t stay colorful for long, and the answer is often the hard water running through their pipes. Installing a water softening system may do more to make your dull clothes pop with color than switching to a more expensive detergent brand.

Soap Scum

When minerals like calcium and magnesium mix with soap, the result is something nasty—soap scum. This substance is difficult to clean and can gunk up your drains if you don’t address the root of the problem.

Hair and Skin Health

When you have hard water, you might notice that you never really feel clean after a shower or bath. The residue that ends up on your water fixtures and bathroom tile is prone to clinging to your skin and hair, too, leaving you with dry skin and dull, stringy hair. Hard water treatment is a great way to up your beauty game.

Expensive Appliance and Pipe Failure

When mineral deposits form on your bathroom counter, it’s an annoyance. When it happens inside your pipes and water-using appliances, it can get expensive. Over time, the deposits will build inside your plumbing and any appliances—refrigerator, dishwasher, washing machine—that are connected to it. You may need to get your machines serviced to solve the problem, and in some cases, you may even need to replace them completely.

Already have hard water treatment installed? Water softener maintenance is key.

If you have already added a water softening system to your home’s plumbing, it is critical to keep it working properly. Water softeners sometimes leak, which can cause significant damage if you don’t catch it immediately. You need to check your brine tank every other month and have the system serviced at least once a year by a professional to keep it working at its best.

Want to learn more? Check out our post on how to find and fix leaks in your water softener.

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Why is water quality important? Your home’s water has a direct impact on your family’s health. Is it doing more harm than good? Here’s what you need to know about your water quality.

We don’t often think about water quality in our homes, at least, not in terms of health and safety. Most of us in the United States do not have to worry about it. Unfortunately, however, in some cases, we should be worried about it.

What if you found out that your water contained microorganisms, heavy metals, or minerals that could make your family sick? Your home’s water quality is an integral part of your family’s life. Your loved ones use it to cook and clean. They drink it straight from the tap to stay hydrated.

Here are some common problems that affect water quality, a few health risks from bad water, how to fix the problem before it gets serious.

Common Problems That Affect Water

Some of the most common water quality problems that affect homeowners include:

  • Hard water
  • High acidity
  • Contamination

Hard water does not cause health issues, but it can cause serious damage to your home’s plumbing. The minerals that make the water “hard” can build up inside the pipes and appliances in your home, leading to repairs that cost thousands.

High acidity in your home’s water, however, can pose a risk to your family’s health. Water with high acidity often contains heavy metals, which can be seriously detrimental if consumed in high amounts.

Water in your home may also contain decaying organic matter. If your water tastes or smells bad, you could have contaminated water that could make your family sick.

Health Risks of Poor-Quality Water

Exposure to heavy metals from acidic water over a long period of time can have serious health consequences. Among them are diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, immune system suppression, and even organ damage. For young children, heavy metal exposure can result in developmental delays.

If your home’s water is contaminated, you could be ingesting dangerous bacteria, including e. coli. Some common diseases that can develop from contaminated water are Hepatitis A, Giardiasis, and Shigellosis. You can also develop respiratory infections, such as Legionnaire’s disease, by inhaling contaminated droplets.

The first step in addressing any water purity problems in your home is to have a complete test done. The test you choose should measure for pH, microorganisms, heavy metals, and hardness.

Once you have your test results, then you can start to work toward better water quality for your family.

Why Is Water Quality Important to You?

Are you worried about the quality of your home’s water? You don’t have to be. Contact Custom Plumbing of Arizona today to talk to us about your options for water filtration and water softener. We are waiting to take your call or answer your email. Don’t hesitate another second while your family’s health could be at risk.

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